Connelly, Michael. The Late Show.

NY: Little, Brown, 2017.

Okay, so LAPD Detective Harry Bosch has been in retirement for the last several volumes of this long-running series (though it doesn’t seem to be slowing him down much), and Harry’s half-brother, Mickey Haller (the “Lincoln lawyer”), never really bloomed as a character the way the author presumably hoped he would. So Connelly decided to come up with a new cop, one young enough to last awhile but senior enough to have interesting cases. Enter Renée Ballard of Hollywood Division (the same place Harry started), now in her mid-30s and a pretty good detective.

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Clowes, Daniel. Patience.

Seattle: Fantagraphics, 2016.

Clowes is probably best known for Ghost World, but he’s done a number of other graphic novels, too. This one is sort of science fiction. It’s 2012 and young Jack Barlow, who is scraping a living by handing out flyers on the street, comes home to find Patience, his wife, murdered. The cops decide he did it, and he spends many months in jail before they give up trying to make their case and cut him loose.

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Backderf, John. My Friend Dahmer.

NY: Abrams, 2012.

Jeffrey Dahmer wasn’t the only serial killer America produced in the late 20th century but he was one of the most disturbing ones, if only because, after he was caught in 1991, he was candid and forthright about what he had done. Unlike Gacy and others who come to mind, he didn’t make excuses or try to shift the blame. But he really didn’t know why he had killed sixteen men, either.

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Dessen, Sarah. Saint Anything.

NY: Viking, 2015.

I’ve become thoroughly hooked on Dessen’s novels, for all that they’re marketed for young adults. Her narrative and character-development skills make her books engaging reading for any age group. There’s rather more trauma this time, though. Seventeen-year-old Sidney Stanford used to practically worship her older brother, Peyton, the local golden boy, but that was before he started making bad decisions and getting arrested.

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Published in: on 2 October 2017 at 5:49 am  Leave a Comment  
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Moon, Fabio & Gabriel Ba. Daytripper.

NY: DC Comics, 2014.

This beautifully written and beautifully drawn work by a pair of Brazilian twin brothers is without doubt the most engrossing and most innovative graphic novel I’ve come across in several years. It certainly deserves the Eisner Award it won. Blas de Oliva Domingos, an aspiring novelist, is the son of a famous author but the only writing he can make a living at is newspaper obituaries. He has a talent for dealing with death — which is a good thing,

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Published in: on 29 September 2017 at 7:11 am  Leave a Comment  
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North, Claire. The Sudden Appearance of Hope.

NY: Orbit, 2016.

North got my attention with The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August and nailed it completely with Touch. Both were highly original science fiction, and this third book under that nom de plume is both more of the same and very different. In each story, she considers people who are deeply human but also different in a single special way from everyone around them. They try to live human lives while dealing with their personal predicaments.

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Corey, James S. A. Gods of Risk. / The Churn.

NY: Orbit, 2012. / NY: Orbit, 2014.

It seems to have become a thing, when you’re producing a long science fiction or fantasy novel series, to take a break now and then and write a piece of short fiction in the same setting, but off at a tangent from the main plot line. Usually, the author takes the opportunity to explore in more detail some background topic or, as is the case with these two novellas, events from a character’s early life. The author always knows more than he tells the reader, but here the writing team of the excellent and immensely popular “Expanse” space opera series will let you on some of what came before.

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Chandler, Raymond. The Big Sleep.

NY: Knopf, 1939.

There are people who will tell you that Philip Marlowe is THE fictional detective in American literature and it’s hard to argue with them. This was his first appearance and Chandler’s prose is as smooth and ironically elegant as it was more than three-quarters of a century ago. It’s not a long book, less than 180 pages, but the author doesn’t waste a single word anywhere. It really does set the standard for every private eye story that came after.

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Leonard, Elmore. The Big Bounce.

NY: Dell, 1969.

Leonard was one of the great crime novelists of the late 20th century, and this is one of his early books, with no actual Good Guys, just an array of greater and lesser Bad Guys, some of whom are quite engaging. It’s a rather short book, but it’s not bad. Ryan is a small-time B-and-E man from Detroit who has spent some time in prison, but he’s not a monster.

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Published in: on 13 September 2017 at 5:37 am  Leave a Comment  
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Pelecanos, George P. The Cut.

NY: Little, Brown, 2011.

Pelecanos is considered one of the best crime novelists writing these days, but some of his books have worked more successfully for me than others. This first entry in a new character series is above-average even for him. And, like all his books, it’s set in the grittier, more crime-ridden parts of blue-collar Washington, D.C., that the tourists never see. Spero Lucas is an adopted Greek, a Marine veteran of Iraq, and now an unlicensed investigator working for attorneys and also doing recovery jobs on the side. If you lose something or have had it stolen, he’ll try to find it for you — for a commission of forty percent of the assessed value.

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