Gauld, Tom. Mooncop.

NY: Drawn & Quarterly, 2016.

Gauld is a new author/artist for me, but I definitely like his style. He’s been published in various newspapers for awhile now, and this appears to be his third graphic novel. Every community needs law enforcement and in the lunar colony, it’s provided by a nameless young man with a glass helmet and an anti-grav patrol car (which doesn’t always work).


Published in: on 14 March 2018 at 1:21 pm  Leave a Comment  
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Bagieu, Penelope. Exquisite Corpse.

NY: First Second, 2015.

Bagieu is a relatively new French graphic novelist with a not-huge output, but she has already made her mark among both readers and critics. Zoe is a Parisian in her early 20s, working as a spokesmodel at auto shows, and introducing new brands of cheese, and whatever else turns up. Not much of a job but it’s a living. Except then she has to go home to her slobbish skinhead boyfriend, who always leaves his socks on when they have sex.


Published in: on 30 January 2018 at 7:22 am  Leave a Comment  
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Bagieu, Penelope. California Dreamin’.

NY: First Second, 2017.

This is one of those books that’s going to mean quite different things to you depending on how old you are. I grew up in Texas in the ’50s, a much bigger fan of Jerry Lee than of Elvis, and I had no use at all for those floppy-haired guys from England with all their “yeah, yeah, yeah.” And then I went to Northern California for a couple of years in the early ’60s just as beach-rock and folk music was being invented. I saw Baez in concert. PP&M came and played on campus for free, just for laughs.


Kleid, Neil & Nicolas Cinquegrani. The Big Kahn.

NY: NBM Publishing, 2009.

The author and artist of this graphic novel are both new to me, though they seem to have a body of work already on the market. It’s kind of a strange one, too. The story opens with the funeral of Rabbi David Kahn, who helped establish New York’s Congregation Beth Shemesh, served as its leader for many years, and was a noted figure in the community. And his eldest son, Avi, presently his father’s assistant, is the obvious choice for the job.


Published in: on 24 November 2017 at 5:32 am  Leave a Comment  
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Eisner, Will. Life, in Pictures: Autobiographical Stories.

NY: Norton, 2007.

Eisner is very much the godfather of the modern graphic novel. There’s a reason the field’s most important award is named for him. This fat compilation volume brings together five previously published pieces, two of them quite long, which are drawn from his own life and ancestry — and if not entirely in a factual sense, then in tone and in general approach.


Clowes, Daniel. Patience.

Seattle: Fantagraphics, 2016.

Clowes is probably best known for Ghost World, but he’s done a number of other graphic novels, too. This one is sort of science fiction. It’s 2012 and young Jack Barlow, who is scraping a living by handing out flyers on the street, comes home to find Patience, his wife, murdered. The cops decide he did it, and he spends many months in jail before they give up trying to make their case and cut him loose.


Backderf, John. My Friend Dahmer.

NY: Abrams, 2012.

Jeffrey Dahmer wasn’t the only serial killer America produced in the late 20th century but he was one of the most disturbing ones, if only because, after he was caught in 1991, he was candid and forthright about what he had done. Unlike Gacy and others who come to mind, he didn’t make excuses or try to shift the blame. But he really didn’t know why he had killed sixteen men, either.


Moon, Fabio & Gabriel Ba. Daytripper.

NY: DC Comics, 2014.

This beautifully written and beautifully drawn work by a pair of Brazilian twin brothers is without doubt the most engrossing and most innovative graphic novel I’ve come across in several years. It certainly deserves the Eisner Award it won. Blas de Oliva Domingos, an aspiring novelist, is the son of a famous author but the only writing he can make a living at is newspaper obituaries. He has a talent for dealing with death — which is a good thing,


Published in: on 29 September 2017 at 7:11 am  Leave a Comment  
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Holm, Jennifer & Matthew Holm. Sunny Side Up.

NY: Scholastic, 2015.

This generally lighthearted (and apparently semi-autobiographical) graphic novel reminds me in its realistic storyline of the work of Raina Telegemeier. It’s the summer of 1976 and ten-year-old Sunshine “Sunny” Lewin (her mom is an ex-hippie) is being packed off from Pennsylvania to Florida to spend a month with her grandfather at his retirement community.


Published in: on 23 September 2017 at 6:05 am  Leave a Comment  
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Backderf, John. Trashed.

NY: Abrams Comics Arts, 2015

Known by the pseudonym “Derf,” Backderf had a syndicated weekly newspaper comic strip for twenty-five years, and won several awards for it, but he really only came to general notice in 2012 with My Friend Dahmer, a graphic memoir about having grown up a schoolmate of the serial killer. This is his second book, rewritten and expanded out of a fifty-page comic published in 2002, and based on his own couple of years as a garbage man at the end of the 1970s, just out of high school.


Published in: on 8 September 2017 at 11:54 am  Leave a Comment  
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