Adams, John Joseph. Federations.

np: CreateSpace, 2016.

Multi-author science fiction anthologies are always a toss-up when it comes to quality. Some editors, like Gardner Dozois, nearly always turn out a superior product, but in most cases you get a few good stories surrounded by considerable dross. That’s certainly the case here, though the twenty-three stories included tend unfortunately more toward the dross side of the ledger. Moreover, the title is somewhat misleading.

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Published in: on 7 December 2017 at 2:31 pm  Leave a Comment  
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Blish, James. A Case of Conscience.

NY: Walker, 1958.

James Blish was one of the more intellectual science fiction authors of the mid-20th century and this is probably his most important work, for which he won a Hugo in 1959. “Religion in science fiction” leads most fans to think of A Canticle for Leibowitz, published at about the same time, but there the Catholic Church was simply the background for a post-holocaust plot line. Blish — who was a thoroughgoing agnostic at the least — is more interested in actual questions of theology. And that makes for a fascinating and involving story. Moreover, it’s only the first of his four books on similar themes.

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Stephenson, Neal & Nicole Galland. The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O.

[My apologies for the long gap between posts. I was out of the country for most of a week and for some reason was unable to access my blog.]

NY: HarperCollins, 2017.

I have a very short list of “automatic” authors — novelists that, whatever they write, I want to read it. I don’t even bother to read the reviews. Neal Stephenson was one of my earliest additions to that list, back when I read Snow Crash and then Cryptonomicon, and he’s never disappointed me. Still, I have my favorites among his works, and there are also those books that I really had to work at. This one falls somewhere in the middle, I think, but I still don’t quite know how I feel about it.

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Taylor, Jodi. A Second Chance.

Abercynon, Wales: Accent Press, 2014.

The “Chronicles of St. Mary’s” series, about time-traveling British historians in the not-too-distant future, has more than a few strange elements, including a bit of mythological fantasy thrown in (Kleio, the Muse of History, is also the Director’s steely-eyed PA). This third episode takes the mix to a whole new and rather complicated level.

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Clowes, Daniel. Patience.

Seattle: Fantagraphics, 2016.

Clowes is probably best known for Ghost World, but he’s done a number of other graphic novels, too. This one is sort of science fiction. It’s 2012 and young Jack Barlow, who is scraping a living by handing out flyers on the street, comes home to find Patience, his wife, murdered. The cops decide he did it, and he spends many months in jail before they give up trying to make their case and cut him loose.

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Tayor, Jodi. A Symphony of Echoes.

Abercynon, Wales: Accent Press, 2013.

The first volume of the “Chronicles of St. Mary’s” series, Just One Damned Thing After Another, was a hoot — a galloping time-travel adventure larded with British-style understated humor and peopled with some of the most original and entertaining characters I’ve seen in a while. This second outing mostly avoids the problems that are common with sophomore novels, continuing the story of St. Mary’s Institute of Historical Institute a generation or two in our future.

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Published in: on 10 October 2017 at 7:22 am  Leave a Comment  
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North, Claire. The Sudden Appearance of Hope.

NY: Orbit, 2016.

North got my attention with The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August and nailed it completely with Touch. Both were highly original science fiction, and this third book under that nom de plume is both more of the same and very different. In each story, she considers people who are deeply human but also different in a single special way from everyone around them. They try to live human lives while dealing with their personal predicaments.

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Corey, James S. A. Gods of Risk. / The Churn.

NY: Orbit, 2012. / NY: Orbit, 2014.

It seems to have become a thing, when you’re producing a long science fiction or fantasy novel series, to take a break now and then and write a piece of short fiction in the same setting, but off at a tangent from the main plot line. Usually, the author takes the opportunity to explore in more detail some background topic or, as is the case with these two novellas, events from a character’s early life. The author always knows more than he tells the reader, but here the writing team of the excellent and immensely popular “Expanse” space opera series will let you on some of what came before.

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Taylor, Jodi. Just One Damned Thing After Another.

Abercynon, Wales: Accent Press, 2013.

I’ve been a science fiction junkie for a long, long time — since early in the first Eisenhower administration, in fact — and time travel has always been one of my most favorite subgenres. There are all sorts of classic tropes involved, and the mood can be dour, cautionary, adventurous, silly, or so complex you have to stop and reread sections to catch just what’s happening. This one, the first of a series, is one of the most complicated, yet carefully thought-out, time travel yarns I’ve read in a long time, and very well written, too.

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Cherrryh, C. J. Convergence.

NY: DAW, 2017.

Cherryh is, beyond dispute, one of the best purveyors of space opera EVER and this is the eighteenth volume of her magnum opus. It’s the story of a human colony ship that lost its way and was forced to land on a previously unknown world that already hosted a relatively advanced humanoid race. That was several centuries ago and the newcomers and the atevi have since learned not only to share the planet (though on different continents, and after some quantity of blood was spilled), they are now cooperating for their mutual benefit.

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