Gauld, Tom. Mooncop.

NY: Drawn & Quarterly, 2016.

Gauld is a new author/artist for me, but I definitely like his style. He’s been published in various newspapers for awhile now, and this appears to be his third graphic novel. Every community needs law enforcement and in the lunar colony, it’s provided by a nameless young man with a glass helmet and an anti-grav patrol car (which doesn’t always work).


Published in: on 14 March 2018 at 1:21 pm  Leave a Comment  
Tags: ,

Silverberg, Robert. Dying Inside.

NY: Ballantine, 1972.

Robert Silverberg has been one of science fiction’s most active authors and editors for most of the past fifty-odd years and his work falls largely on the “intellectual” end of the SF spectrum. He’s done fantasy and space opera, but his most important books are those that investigate the human mind and condition, and often with only a relatively thin science-fictional skin. This one began with the title, originally a New York-Jewish idiom, and the author decided it referred in his case to a character with something literally dying inside him. Not an organ but an unusual mental ability, like telepathy.


Published in: on 6 March 2018 at 9:03 am  Leave a Comment  
Tags: , ,

Sawyer, Robert J. End of an Era.

NY: Tor, 1994.

Sawyer is the best-known Canadian author of science fiction — one of the most successful Canadian authors of any kind, actually — but I’ve always found his books rather uneven. Some are absorbing while others (like the “WWW” trilogy) are almost unreadable. This early effort is right in the middle of the pack.


Thomsen, Brian M. & Martin H. Greenberg (eds). A Date Which Will Live in Infamy: An Anthology of Pearl Harbor Stories That Might Have Been.

Nashville, TN: Cumberland House, 2001.

As a working archivist & historian for fifty years, and a science fiction junkie for rather longer than that, I’ve always been a sucker for the alternate history yarn. Change one tiny, believable thing and what are the consequences? (And the tinier and more mundane the change, the better.) The Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor has long been a popular “point of departure,” if only because what actually happened seems like such a confluence of coincidence and serendipity in retrospect. The Japanese basically caught every good break it was possible to catch.


Wilson, Robert Charles. Last Year.

NY: Tor, 2016.

I’ve always been a sucker for a good time travel yarn and this is one of the best I’ve read in some time, with a highly innovative plotline and writing of very high quality. Wilson isn’t a terribly prolific writer but everything he turns out seems either to win a major award or at least be shortlisted for one.


Greenberg, Martin H. (ed). The End of the World: Stories of the Apocalypse.

NY: Skyhorse Publishing, 2010.

Greenberg has been enormously prolific over the years as an anthologist of short-form science fiction and fantasy, and he can usually be depended upon for a thematic collection that will hold your interest. The theme here is just what it says: The many ways in which the world — or at least human civilization — might end, whether with a bang or a whimper, and what comes after. Always assuming there is an “after.”


Card, Orson Scott. Ender’s Game.

NY: Tor, 1985.

There’s a rather short list of really important modern science fiction novels, the books that influenced the next generation of both readers and younger authors. This is one of those novels. The original novelette version was nominated for both the Hugo and the Nebula and the novel-length version won both those awards. It’s also a book that hardly anyone who’s read it shrugs off. They tend either to love it, for a whole bunch of reasons, or to hate it, for a whole bunch of other reasons.


Strahan, Jonathan (ed). Edge of Infinity.

Oxford, UK: Solaris, 2012.

Only to experienced science fiction readers who are used to thinking in terms of galaxy-spanning distances would our own planetary system seem “local,” but that’s the theme of this anthology of original short pieces by an array of authors both well-known and not so much. In his introduction, Strahan makes the point that SF has long been obsessed with its own death as a genre, but this is because science fiction is constantly being “killed by science.”


Adams, John Joseph. Federations.

np: CreateSpace, 2016.

Multi-author science fiction anthologies are always a toss-up when it comes to quality. Some editors, like Gardner Dozois, nearly always turn out a superior product, but in most cases you get a few good stories surrounded by considerable dross. That’s certainly the case here, though the twenty-three stories included tend unfortunately more toward the dross side of the ledger. Moreover, the title is somewhat misleading.


Published in: on 7 December 2017 at 2:31 pm  Leave a Comment  

Blish, James. A Case of Conscience.

NY: Walker, 1958.

James Blish was one of the more intellectual science fiction authors of the mid-20th century and this is probably his most important work, for which he won a Hugo in 1959. “Religion in science fiction” leads most fans to think of A Canticle for Leibowitz, published at about the same time, but there the Catholic Church was simply the background for a post-holocaust plot line. Blish — who was a thoroughgoing agnostic at the least — is more interested in actual questions of theology. And that makes for a fascinating and involving story. Moreover, it’s only the first of his four books on similar themes.