Clowes, Daniel. Patience.

Seattle: Fantagraphics, 2016.

Clowes is probably best known for Ghost World, but he’s done a number of other graphic novels, too. This one is sort of science fiction. It’s 2012 and young Jack Barlow, who is scraping a living by handing out flyers on the street, comes home to find Patience, his wife, murdered. The cops decide he did it, and he spends many months in jail before they give up trying to make their case and cut him loose.

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Tayor, Jodi. A Symphony of Echoes.

Abercynon, Wales: Accent Press, 2013.

The first volume of the “Chronicles of St. Mary’s” series, Just One Damned Thing After Another, was a hoot — a galloping time-travel adventure larded with British-style understated humor and peopled with some of the most original and entertaining characters I’ve seen in a while. This second outing mostly avoids the problems that are common with sophomore novels, continuing the story of St. Mary’s Institute of Historical Institute a generation or two in our future.

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Published in: on 10 October 2017 at 7:22 am  Leave a Comment  
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North, Claire. The Sudden Appearance of Hope.

NY: Orbit, 2016.

North got my attention with The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August and nailed it completely with Touch. Both were highly original science fiction, and this third book under that nom de plume is both more of the same and very different. In each story, she considers people who are deeply human but also different in a single special way from everyone around them. They try to live human lives while dealing with their personal predicaments.

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Corey, James S. A. Gods of Risk. / The Churn.

NY: Orbit, 2012. / NY: Orbit, 2014.

It seems to have become a thing, when you’re producing a long science fiction or fantasy novel series, to take a break now and then and write a piece of short fiction in the same setting, but off at a tangent from the main plot line. Usually, the author takes the opportunity to explore in more detail some background topic or, as is the case with these two novellas, events from a character’s early life. The author always knows more than he tells the reader, but here the writing team of the excellent and immensely popular “Expanse” space opera series will let you on some of what came before.

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Taylor, Jodi. Just One Damned Thing After Another.

Abercynon, Wales: Accent Press, 2013.

I’ve been a science fiction junkie for a long, long time — since early in the first Eisenhower administration, in fact — and time travel has always been one of my most favorite subgenres. There are all sorts of classic tropes involved, and the mood can be dour, cautionary, adventurous, silly, or so complex you have to stop and reread sections to catch just what’s happening. This one, the first of a series, is one of the most complicated, yet carefully thought-out, time travel yarns I’ve read in a long time, and very well written, too.

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Cherrryh, C. J. Convergence.

NY: DAW, 2017.

Cherryh is, beyond dispute, one of the best purveyors of space opera EVER and this is the eighteenth volume of her magnum opus. It’s the story of a human colony ship that lost its way and was forced to land on a previously unknown world that already hosted a relatively advanced humanoid race. That was several centuries ago and the newcomers and the atevi have since learned not only to share the planet (though on different continents, and after some quantity of blood was spilled), they are now cooperating for their mutual benefit.

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Chambers, Becky. A Closed and Common Orbit.

NY: Harper, 2016.

This author’s very first novel, The Long Way to a Small Angry Planet, was one of the best science fiction novels of the past five or six years, and I enjoyed it immensely. This semi-sequel is set in the same future but focuses on Pepper, the gifted mechanic who is only one of the supporting players in the earlier story, and on Lovelace, the Wayfarer’s reborn AI from the earlier book who has been evicted from her home.

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Scalzi, John. The Collapsing Empire.

NY: Tor, 2017.

When it comes to writing SF novels, Scalzi doesn’t always hit it out of the park, but he does have a very good batting average. I’ve seen some highly critical comments recently about this opening volume of his new space opera series from apparently disappointed fans, so I approached it with some trepidation. Damned if I can see what they’re complaining about, though. It’s an action-packed adventure with bigger-than-life (and frequently off-the-wall) characters, a supporting cast of billions, creditable pseudo-science (and some of the real stuff, too), and a skein of plotlines that will definitely hold your attention.

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Mastai, Elan. All Our Wrong Todays.

NY: Dutton, 2017.

I’ve always been a sucker for a good time travel story, and this first novel is not only well-written and complexly plotted, it’s very innovative. Consider what the world might be like in 2016 if an essentially free and unlimited power source had been discovered back in July 1965. Turns out it’s very much like the covers of the pulps of the ’50s, with flying cars, jet packs, domestic robots, teleportation, antigravity, plentiful food, no wars to speak of, and very little crime.

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Card, Orson Scott (ed.). Masterpieces: The Best Science Fiction of the Century.

NY: Ace Books, 2001.

“Best of” anthologies by multiple authors are a good way to catch up on above-average stories you might have missed the first time around, or to revisit those you haven’t seen in some time. But while there’s some superior writing among the twenty-seven short pieces in this volume, “best of the century” considerably overstates the case.

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Published in: on 20 June 2017 at 4:56 am  Leave a Comment  
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